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All hail the mighty kale!

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Environmentalists cite meat production as one of the biggest contributors to global warming, and the nutritionists suggest the healthiest choice is making vegetables and fruit the biggest part of every meal by reducing consumption of animal proteins. Kale is far more nutritious than other leafy greens, but there are several reasons why it is such an important future food...
1. Anti-inflammatory: Inflammation is the number one cause of arthritis, heart disease and a number of autoimmune diseases, and is triggered by the consumption of animal products. Kale is an incredibly effective anti-inflammatory food, potentially preventing and even reversing these illnesses. 2. Iron: Despite the myth that vegetarians are anemic, the number of non-vegetarians with iron-deficiencies is on the rise. Per calorie, kale has more iron than beef. 3. Calcium: Kale contains more calcium per calorie than milk (90 grams per serving) and is also better absorbed by the body than dairy. 4. Fibre: Like protein, fibre is a macronutrient, which means we need it every day. But many people don’t eat nearly enough and the deficiency is linked to heart disease, digestive disorders and cancer. Protein-rich foods, like meat, contain little to no fiber. One serving of kale not only contains 5 percent of the recommended daily intake of fibre, but it also provides 2 grams of protein. 5. Omega fatty acids: Essential Omega fats play an important role in our health, unlike the saturated fats in meat. A serving of kale contains 121 mg of omega-3 fatty acids and 92.4 mg of omega-6 fatty acids. 6. Immunity:Superbugs and bacteria are a serious risk to our health. Many of these come as a result of factory farm meat, eggs and dairy products. Kale is an incredibly rich source of immune-boosting carotenoid and flavanoid antioxidants including vitamins A and C. 7. Sustainable: Kale grows to maturity in 55 to 60 days versus a cow raised for beef for an average of 18-24 months. Kale can grow in most climates and is relatively easy and low impact to grow at home or on a farm. To raise one pound of beef requires 16 pounds of grain, 11 times as much fossil fuel and more than 2,400 gallons of water.
Not persuaded to give kale a go? Try our favourite recipe for these delicious kale crisps, we promise you will be converted!
Spiced Kale Crisps Ingredients
  • 100g chunky chopped kale or kale leaves, tough stalks removed
  • ½ tbsp olive oil
  • 1 heaped tsp ras el hanout
  • Sea salt
Method
  • Heat oven to 150C/130C fan/gas 2
  • Line 2 baking trays with baking parchment
  • Wash the kale and dry thoroughly. Place in a large bowl, tearing any large leaves into smaller pieces
  • Drizzle over the oil, then massage into the kale
  • Sprinkle over the ras el hanout and some sea salt, mix well, then tip onto the trays and spread out in a single layer
  • Bake for 18-22 mins or until crisp but still green, then leave to cool for a few mins
  • Enjoy!
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